GX500 build

Flyinhillbilly

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Spent a little quality time with the reamers and connecting rod tonight, and got a real nice slip fit.
It only took me about 20 passes to get that .005” removed. ADF0A0D4-5C58-4151-8A08-F974B3ED1371.jpeg
 

Flyinhillbilly

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Did a mock up and discovered that I’m going to have to machine some holes in the block to clear the billet rod with the stroker crank.
time for some stroker patches.
 

Denny

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Well that happens. Back in the early 70’s they would machine everything out of a small block Chevy 283 block. And then weld in new cylinders and bracing along with deck plates and build 400 plus cubic inch small blocks.
 

Mammoth

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I pointed out the wrong hole. Its this one. It looks like yours doesn't have it.
They may have stopped doing that hole, because its literally drilled all the way through so oil leaks out.20211115_181918.jpg
 

Willie1

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According to the math on mean piston speed I should be safe at 7500.
You’ve nailed my whole reason behind doing this with the RPM. My thought is that if I can make enough torque that I won’t have to rev the engine nearly as much, so it should last better.
I blew up 3 really nice small blocks this year and I believe that it was because we have to turn them 9-10k rpm to get the job done.
I see you are adjusting your redline down by the engine speed - longer stroke at less RPM's gives you the same piston speed. Have you factored in piston weight? How much heavier is the 96mm piston than the stock 88mm? I think you see where this is going - a heavier piston can weigh the same (and stress the rod the same) at 7200 as a lighter one at 7500. Even 10 grams can make a difference, especially when a different crank may not be balanced for the new combo.

Not trying to be a smart Alec here. We used to mix-n-match parts in small engines for pulling tractors 40 years ago, with varied results. Some worked out well - ran smooth with good power. Other combos were miserable, expensive mistakes, that either would shake your fillings out or grenade quite impressively. Just trying to respectfully ask a couple questions, and why I'm asking. Sounds like it will be a neat build. Willie
 

Flyinhillbilly

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I see you are adjusting your redline down by the engine speed - longer stroke at less RPM's gives you the same piston speed. Have you factored in piston weight? How much heavier is the 96mm piston than the stock 88mm? I think you see where this is going - a heavier piston can weigh the same (and stress the rod the same) at 7200 as a lighter one at 7500. Even 10 grams can make a difference, especially when a different crank may not be balanced for the new combo.

Not trying to be a smart Alec here. We used to mix-n-match parts in small engines for pulling tractors 40 years ago, with varied results. Some worked out well - ran smooth with good power. Other combos were miserable, expensive mistakes, that either would shake your fillings out or grenade quite impressively. Just trying to respectfully ask a couple questions, and why I'm asking. Sounds like it will be a neat build. Willie
The 96mm piston is significantly lighter than the stock piston. I haven’t weighed them, but you can feel the difference when you hold them in your hand.
At 7500, the piston speed works out to 3400fos, which should be very safe.
 

Denny

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The underside of the piston looks like a pretty “rough” casting. Are you worried about stress risers or are you going to polish it out? Or maybe even shot peen it?
 
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