Yerf Dog thoughts

Hellion

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I'm confused Mixap. You've been showing us nice karts (buggies really) at high prices but it sounds like you want a fixer-upper:

I wanted to get something that would last and that I could learn on repairing slowly that is easy to repair.

This is DIY Go Karts, not Showroom Go Karts. We fix 'em up so I would encourage you to, you know, look at the lower end of what is for sale locally and follow our lead.

Don’t need all the bells and whistles but I see a lot with rust all over and that seems like a bigger job than the rest of it.

Okay got it, no bells and whistles. Does it have to have a cage on it and room for two people? Is safety first and foremost in your mind necessitating a cage [aka brush guard or roll bar] and even seat belts?

Rust is easily dealt with, we have the technology and the means for that--it's not that big of a deal at all. Obviously you don't want your project kart to have cancerous rust that has eaten away parts of the frame or left it looking like someone blasted it with buckshot, but if that is your major hurdle here, I do hereby encourage you to make that leap and EMBRACE the RUST. :thumbsup:

Yeh, and those Chinese buggies with all the bells and whistles are loaded with nightmarish problems. You've been on this forum long enough to have seen the countless requests for help

That's why I put a disclaimer in my statement that most of them have been rode hard, abused and left outside and all that.
Did you not read me? The major issues are the wiring; it's the wiring man. Then again we are mechanics and fixers, we fix things. Are you saying some niggling wiring issues are too big for you (or us) to deal with? That's kind of a defeatist attitude. :surrender:

Yes I know, some of the Chinese made karts and fun vehicles are total garbage however some are not. I have a Chinese Baja Warrior MB200, totally delightful minibike, no issues whatsoever.

I've been here long enough and I totally agree with the rest of the forum that the old American made karts are best: Carter Brothers, Ken Bar Mfg, Manco, Bristers, Murray, Clark, Yerf-Dog, etc., but many of those are very basic and not what Mixap showed us in image #1, post #1.

Too easy to buy an old Murray or Yerf-Dog frame in the, say $300-$500 range that needs some work and that you can learn on. You won't be alone in that endeavor; you have this forum and the vastness of the interwebz and places like Youtube (a huge, free information dump)....

:popcorn:
 

Mixap

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I appreciate all your help, just trying to learn here. I am looking for something that my son can ride right away, and yes, with roll bars for safety. Also something that is easy to fix down the line so I can keep it going for a long time. I will jump in with questions when it’s time to fix and appreciate all of everyone’s knowledge! When I posted the first ones I had no idea what to look for but I am learning more as everyone sends tips. I will definitely look for something American made. Thank you!
 

Mixap

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Ok, what are your thoughts on this one, it’s a Manco. He is willing to take $600. Any idea on things I should do to it first, bigger tires in the back?1453D468-5DCC-4885-81C7-94521E20A9B4.png
 

panchothedog

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Putting seat belts on should be easy. All of the kart shops sell belts and harness kits that are sized to fit a kart. For tire size, we need to see the back end of the kart. Clutch or torque converter. Is it live axle, and does it have suspension in the rear, or is it ridged frame. Can't tell from the picture you posted.
 

Mixap

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Putting seat belts on should be easy. All of the kart shops sell belts and harness kits that are sized to fit a kart. For tire size, we need to see the back end of the kart. Clutch or torque converter. Is it live axle, and does it have suspension in the rear, or is it ridged frame. Can't tell from the picture you posted.
Once I get it I will share a picture of the back end. Thank you for your help!
 

70Cobra

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The Manco has a really nice 1.25" tube frame. I got one of these as my first go kart. The shocks, single A arms and steering suck. So do the small tires lol.

I cut the front end off and grafted in a quad bikes front frame section. It's a bit of work but it's well worth it, makes it so much more enjoyable.

This kart had seat belts from factory. You can see the tabs on the main hoop for the shoulder pivot and also where the retractor sat below it.
 

Mixap

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The steering does suck! Did you have to weld to put in the new front end? The seat belts are shot, any you recommend that will fit? Anything besides the retractable ones?
 

Hellion

Disc brakes are for cowards
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The steering does suck! Did you have to weld to put in the new front end? The seat belts are shot, any you recommend that will fit? Anything besides the retractable ones?

Before you commit to all these crazy changes just run the kart as-is. I'd DO NOTHING except run it as-is. It does run and drive right?
Right off the bat I see it has been hit by the flat black 'paint bomb' and the original seats/seat vinyl is long gone, so that's a bit of a warning that its had a rough life. You just have to be careful with what you buy used/pre-owned as most previous owners are total buffoons. 😏

Just so you know, go kart steering basically "sucks" as a rule because it's often a manual, direct-link system and has no mechanical advantage like steering gears or a rack and pinion. For the best possible steering, make sure the front tires are properly inflated (I'd suggest maximum PSI) and as always, go around the kart with your oil can and lubricate everything in the steering system that rotates--this usually includes the king pins, steering shaft, the bushings that it rotates on and all the ball linkages or heim joints.

*I use an old fashioned oil can that dispenses oil one drop at a time and I typically eschew stuff like WD-40 because it is too thin and watery and sprays everywhere making a mess.

At the very minimum, disassemble the steering components, inspect and if needed, clean and polish the kingpins (the vertical bolts), the inside of the spindles and everything else because water migrates into every hole, opening and crevice and rusts all the moving parts. A few years of rust and pitting can make the steering very stiff.

Adding a Zerk (grease) fitting to the spindle per this illustration is a super idea:

5F7FFE31-64AB-436D-9BCC-F28841DA5D43_4_5005_c.jpeg
 

Hellion

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For ultimate safety I would aim for seat belts, or rather a 5-point racing style harness to keep you and your child's butts planted in the seats in case of a roll over....but that kind of situation honestly sounds nightmarish in a kart. Avoidance is the better option but in the worse case scenario, they do make kart-appropriate seat belts at the regular sites like BMI Karts and Gopowersports (and half a million other sites with more competitive pricing I would say). For example: https://www.bmikarts.com/5-Point-Seat-Belt-Shoulder-Harness-6000354_p_3215.html

I was reminded that there are steering spindles that are supported by ball bearings. If there are some that fit your application, then that is definitely an option to consider for lighter, easier steering. Examples: https://www.bmikarts.com/Racing-Kart-Spindles
 

Mixap

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Before you commit to all these crazy changes just run the kart as-is. I'd DO NOTHING except run it as-is. It does run and drive right?
Right off the bat I see it has been hit by the flat black 'paint bomb' and the original seats/seat vinyl is long gone, so that's a bit of a warning that its had a rough life. You just have to be careful with what you buy used/pre-owned as most previous owners are total buffoons. 😏

Just so you know, go kart steering basically "sucks" as a rule because it's often a manual, direct-link system and has no mechanical advantage like steering gears or a rack and pinion. For the best possible steering, make sure the front tires are properly inflated (I'd suggest maximum PSI) and as always, go around the kart with your oil can and lubricate everything in the steering system that rotates--this usually includes the king pins, steering shaft, the bushings that it rotates on and all the ball linkages or heim joints.

*I use an old fashioned oil can that dispenses oil one drop at a time and I typically eschew stuff like WD-40 because it is too thin and watery and sprays everywhere making a mess.

At the very minimum, disassemble the steering components, inspect and if needed, clean and polish the kingpins (the vertical bolts), the inside of the spindles and everything else because water migrates into every hole, opening and crevice and rusts all the moving parts. A few years of rust and pitting can make the steering very stiff.

Adding a Zerk (grease) fitting to the spindle per this illustration is a super idea:

View attachment 143727
This is great! I was going to just ride it for awhile but do need to add seat belts. I will try oil on everything first and see how it goes.
the first night we got it home my son did break off the clip that holds on the cover to the air filter so I am replacing that and an oil change since it looked like black water. I am going to check out the Zerk grease fitting, thanks!
 

Mixap

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For ultimate safety I would aim for seat belts, or rather a 5-point racing style harness to keep you and your child's butts planted in the seats in case of a roll over....but that kind of situation honestly sounds nightmarish in a kart. Avoidance is the better option but in the worse case scenario, they do make kart-appropriate seat belts at the regular sites like BMI Karts and Gopowersports (and half a million other sites with more competitive pricing I would say). For example: https://www.bmikarts.com/5-Point-Seat-Belt-Shoulder-Harness-6000354_p_3215.html

I was reminded that there are steering spindles that are supported by ball bearings. If there are some that fit your application, then that is definitely an option to consider for lighter, easier steering. Examples: https://www.bmikarts.com/Racing-Kart-Spindles
Thanks for the tips Hellion, I will check these out!
 

70Cobra

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The steering does suck! Did you have to weld to put in the new front end? The seat belts are shot, any you recommend that will fit? Anything besides the retractable ones?
Well yes, you need to be able to weld.

Google or amazon will get you a set. You will need to do some measuring to work out what size you need.
 
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