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Working on my new (old) shop.

anickode

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Coming up on 2 years since we moved, and I've finally gotten around to working on one of my barns. The lockdown was a god send... Would have taken me a year or more of weekends to get to this point.

I had to replace the sill plates, toe boards, anchor bolts, the bottoms of some of the ribs, and the "footing" under the back wall.

The whole barn is made from rough sawn red oak, and the ribs are laid up with 5 layers of 1"x2½" oak strip. Of course green rough sawn oak isn't as readily available as it was 70ish years ago, so I opted for pine, and the cheapest way to get full inch thick boards with square corners was to run half a bunk of 2x3s through my planer. 4 passes. Replacement bottom sections were formed on a jig, with staggered ends. Cut the old ones to match, and screw together. I'm adding one more later all the way up and over to stiffen it up a bit more and bring the rib face out flush with the wind bracing for finishing purposes.

Sill plates are now pressured treated, ground contact rated. 1/2" hot dip galvanized anchor bolts epoxied in every 3 feet, and the toe boards are secured with 4" stainless screws every 6 inches.

Back "footing" is a little weird. The barn was shortened decades ago, so the back wall spans the slab. It was previously sitting on a row of 4" thick solid cement blocks floated on a bed of mortar up to 4½" thick, with no bond to the slab. Wind had pushed the back wall in 8" at the center. New footing is a poured curb with rebar drilled and epoxied into the slab, and rebar down the length.

Next big hurdle is new roof and siding. The roof is curved, so that rather complicates things as far as modern steel products go. Right now it's 1¼" mini corrugated held down with lead head nails. Working to find a product that will "walk down" to the curve rather than having to buy pre rolled sheets which quadruples the cost.

Also going to add a man door where the window (hole) currently is, and widen the main door from 14' to 20', and build a vertical bifold steel door for it (like an airplane hangar door.

And then there's insulation and finishing the inside.
 

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anickode

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This building will eventually be a dedicated fabrication and metalworking shop. Still a ways to go, but at least I know it's not going to pancake under a snow load this winter.
 

anickode

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I was up on the roof yesterday afternoon trimming some branches away... It's kind of funny how springy the building is. It's super rigid as a whole, and 100% structurally sound, but definitely a bit springy.
 

anickode

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There's enough square footage for some rubber mark art! (indoor donuts!)

Eh... It's not THAT big (35x45) and the floor is way too rough. Besides, I really don't want skid marks all over my shop floor.

Eventually I'll have the slab resurfaced and leveled. I'd like to get it flat within +/- 1/8" for bigger layout and fab work.

PoCo should be out to install an electric meter within the next couple days. Been running off temp service from the house (all those big *** snowmaking cords found a new purpose), but once the meter is in, it'll have a dedicated 200 amp service with a separate drop from the pole.

I would LOVE to build a bridge crane in there, but that's a way down the road, if ever project.
 

anickode

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I've got poweeeeeeeer! Still need the final inspection, but at least I don't have to stretch extension cords across the yard anymore. To suit the "requirements" to install a panel, I put one GFCI outlet under the panel, and one light socket on the ceiling. Beyond that, I'm just going to run those monster 250w LED temp lights for now, since all the final electrical will be surface run conduit over the interior skin.

I'll probably save the old siding from the outside. The back side of it still looks quite nice, so I'll probably reuse it for the inside, then spray it white. Nail holes won't look very nice, but it's a tradeoff for saving 5 grand.
 

gegcorp2012

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Really nice work with the repairs on the shop.

That building must be really glad to have an owner like you ! Electricity is a real game changer for a shop.

Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk
 
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