Polarity reversal, inverter or not, A/C or D/C, need info (sic; lessons)................

madprofessor

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Got all my welding knowledge pretty much OJT over some 40 years, never been to an actual welding class in my life. Classroom is the missing part here, basic book learning about reversing the stinger and the ground, using an inverter type welder or other, difference between A/C and D/C welders, etc.
Question #1: When should the stinger be plugged into the negative connection, and what type of welder would require doing that?
...................#2: What's the difference between my cheap 80 amp inverter stick welder and a non-inverter type?
....................#more and etc.: Hoping some experienced/knowledgeable folks will jump in here for more related issue questions (ie; free welder lessons).
 

Denny

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An inverter type welder will allow the arc to be steadier and smoother. It’s my understanding. All I know is some materials require polarity reversal to get a quality weld. Some materials prefer to be welded with d/c like stainless steel (most alloys) and aluminum. That’s all I remember from welding class 35 years ago.
 

madprofessor

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That stainless steel and the aluminum would be MIG or TIG, correct? Shielding gas welding. Want to learn it, my welder will do TIG if I buy everything for it. Current sales note: The $130 Ironton version of my Klutch welder is on sale right now for $100 at Northern Tool, but the additional TIG kit for it is $120.
Add to that a big gas bottle, the first fill of Argon shielding gas in it, a high pressure regulator, and a flowmeter, just to get started on TIG.
 

dthames

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"#1: When should the stinger be plugged into the negative connection, and what type of welder would require doing that?" A traditional DC welder would be an answer. Reversing the polarity on the stinger will change the heat so more is on the workpiece or more on the rod.
 

madprofessor

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AC has the current flowing one way, then the other, switching at a rate based on the AC frequency,
Right, VAC, Volts Alternating Current. But I thought an inverter welder worked like a diode, converting AC to DC so that it acts as a DC welder. Have I just got the terminology wrong, confusing myself?
 
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