no spark?

Messages
38
Reaction score
43
hello. I have a stage 4 mini bike. i had it sit for a week, and when i tried to start it, nothing. pulled the plug and there is zero spark. I suspect the coil. the plug looks great. my coil is an aftermarket coil with an msd wire. the coilgap looks good and the magnet is pretty strong (im running an arc billet flywheel with 32 degrees advance). is there anything that could be the culprit other than the coil?
 

Rat

Well-known member
Messages
1,148
Reaction score
696
Location
SW Virginia
hello. I have a stage 4 mini bike. i had it sit for a week, and when i tried to start it, nothing. pulled the plug and there is zero spark. I suspect the coil. the plug looks great. my coil is an aftermarket coil with an msd wire. the coilgap looks good and the magnet is pretty strong (im running an arc billet flywheel with 32 degrees advance). is there anything that could be the culprit other than the coil?
The spark wire itself not making contact with the coil stud.

I use a spiral core automotive lead on my 208, the best way I have found to make sure the lead makes good contact is to cut the insulation so that there is 1-2mm of the core hanging out, put a bit of dielectric grease on the tip and crank it in.

I mean CRANK IT, it will fit snug but unless you get really agressive with tools trying to turn it you arent going to harm the lead any by twisting the hell out of it.
The dielectric serves more than one purpose in this situation the first is simply lubricant to get it to expand over the screw as well as slide down into the slightly tapered cup it sits in the bottom of.
Once in the dielectric will be a moisture barrier
 
Messages
38
Reaction score
43
The spark wire itself not making contact with the coil stud.

I use a spiral core automotive lead on my 208, the best way I have found to make sure the lead makes good contact is to cut the insulation so that there is 1-2mm of the core hanging out, put a bit of dielectric grease on the tip and crank it in.

I mean CRANK IT, it will fit snug but unless you get really agressive with tools trying to turn it you arent going to harm the lead any by twisting the hell out of it.
The dielectric serves more than one purpose in this situation the first is simply lubricant to get it to expand over the screw as well as slide down into the slightly tapered cup it sits in the bottom of.
Once in the dielectric will be a moisture barrier
sorry for being inactive. you were right. the spark wire socket to connect to the coil stud got pulled back through the boot. works now.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rat

Rat

Well-known member
Messages
1,148
Reaction score
696
Location
SW Virginia
sorry for being inactive. you were right. the spark wire socket to connect to the coil stud got pulled back through the boot. works now.
Good to see it was that simple. If that hadn't worked out, my next suggestion would have been continuity testing the kill switch circuit (if you have one wired in) to make sure it wasn't acting up
 
Top