long lasting mini bike brake pads?

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hello, i have a mini bike with a built predator 212 that i recently got, fast as hell, but eats break pads VERY fast. I get 2 hours max off of a set and have to adjust the cable arm back every 45 mins because it bottoms out on the cable housing holder. the caliper is just a generic 10 dollar amazon caliper. does anybody have recommendations for any better quality pads or how to reduce the wear? all the pads i can find are generic amazon ones.
 

Hellion

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When I am obsessed with speed, I am not interested in stopping.😄 No honestly, I'm not riding the brakes all the time.

Your BRAKE pad life sound ridiculous. I don't even know what kind of brake "10 dollar Amazon caliper" is. I think Denny is entirely right though and that "10 dollar" price is part of your problem. They're too cheap.

Where's the pics? It's 2023 and everyone has a camera phone--how come no one ever posts pics?
 

Rat

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the caliper is just a generic 10 dollar amazon caliper. does anybody have recommendations for any better quality pads or how to reduce the wear? all the pads i can find are generic amazon ones.
The caliper is only one component in the system, what rotors are you using, more importantly what diameter.
A larger rotor (if you have the clearance) will shed more heat (90% responsible for brake fade) and the larger diameter essentially reduces the rpm of the rotor at the pad but increases stopping leverage.
The difference is much like that between trying to crank a stuck bolt with only a ratchet, and going at the same stuck bolt with a 2ft breaker bar.

AFAIK, most minis (like Colman CT200's) run a 140mm rotor and have just enough clearance for a 180mm at the most iirc.

I run a Colman CT200U style caliper for my rear brake mated to a 203mm rotor, I've got more weight and maybe power to stop. As a life long 2wheeled menace, dominantly brake with the front with he only exceptions being sketchy variables like loose sand or gravel on top of pave... anyway it doesn't bite like my front caliper but does well enough.

If your calipers mount with the same 51mm ISO that MTB calipers do as I suspect they do, I know a mech dual actuated caliper that would probably send you OTB in a hurry if you tried to punch it being funny... you'd just need to find the appropriate ISO risers for your rotor diameter
 
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alright thank you guys, my dad has a mtb with hydraulic brakes thats sitting, and the calipers look like they might fit. im gonna see if i can convince him
 

Rat

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alright thank you guys, my dad has a mtb with hydraulic brakes thats sitting, and the calipers look like they might fit. im gonna see if i can convince him

Assuming the possible donor is a typical MTB that has not seen serious upgrades it will have 160mm rotors standard... pretty sure Mini bikes have 140mm as their standard, which means you'll still need to source the correct ISO adapter parts (or try to find 160mm rotors that match your bolt pattern. Although they look the same the spacing on mtb 6bolt IS NOT the same as mini bike 3bolt) to place the pads properly in the brake path of the rotor.

Swapping used hydraulic brakes from one bike to another means you'd be best off just getting a F/R kit new... if you're going to play cheap your going to get yourself screwwed so at least get new pads, a bleed kit, and mineral oil to redo the brakes with.
 
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Willie1

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The caliper is only one component in the system, what rotors are you using, more importantly what diameter.
A larger rotor (if you have the clearance) will shed more heat (90% responsible for brake fade) and the larger diameter essentially reduces the rpm of the rotor at the pad but increases stopping leverage.
Not sure what you mean by this.
At a given speed, the surface of the rotor passes through the caliper/pads faster on a larger rotor than they do on a smaller one.
At a given speed, the pads on a larger rotor scrub more total surface area than they do on a smaller one.
Given this, the pad surface would think the rotor RPM has been increased, not reduced.
Yes, a larger rotor can dissipate more heat, due to the larger surface area, resulting in better braking and less fade.
Yes, a larger rotor can increase the apply leverage, and increase braking power.
So, while braking power generally increases with rotor diameter, pad wear may actually get worse, depending on the friction material
used in them, the material and surface finish of the different rotors, etc.
 

Rat

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Not sure what you mean by this.
At a given speed, the surface of the rotor passes through the caliper/pads faster on a larger rotor than they do on a smaller one.
ITS ALL ABOUT LEVERAGE as well as heat dissipation.

As for the rpm reference is comes down diameter. Sure rpm is rpm, but what changes is the fact 10 rpm of a 140mm is not the same as 10rpm of a 180mm rotor... this is most obvious in tire sizes, and the physics are exactly the same.

Larger rotor more stopping leverage. More leverage means you stop better and sooner. Stopping sooner means less time mashing the brakes... WHICH MEANS LESS PAD WEAR.

It's all relative physics.

Larger calipers and pads cover more rotor area NOT the other way around because a 1" wide by 1/2" tall pad is only going to cover that amount of rotor whether the rotor is 140mm or a 140 inches so physical rotor size is completely irrelevant in that respect, provided the caliper can handle the given size rotor.

As for pad longevity, sintered ceramic seems to do the best for wear, but at the price if initial bite (they bite best after they heat up a bit) in my experience... and any type of organic and/or resin based ones tend to stop the best across all temp ranges but wear the fastest and have the worst wet performance
 
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Willie1

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ITS ALL ABOUT LEVERAGE as well as heat dissipation. Agreed, never argued

As for the rpm reference is comes down diameter. Sure rpm is rpm, but what changes is the fact 10 rpm of a 140mm is not the same as 10rpm of a 180mm rotor... this is most obvious in tire sizes, and the physics are exactly the same.
That was my point - the surface of the rotor is traveling under the pads faster with a larger rotor, and the pads sweep over more surface area with a larger rotor.

Larger rotor more stopping leverage. More leverage means you stop better and sooner. Stopping sooner means less time mashing the brakes... WHICH MEANS LESS PAD WEAR. Agreed to about the leverage. The pad material and/or the surface condition/material of the pad may not work with the increased swept area of the rotor, or the extra speed that the surface area passes under the pads, causing accelerated pad wear. I'm only suggesting that this is a possibility which depends on the composition of the pads.

It's all relative physics. YUP

Larger calipers and pads cover more rotor area NOT the other way around because a 1" wide by 1/2" tall pad is only going to cover that amount of rotor whether the rotor is 140mm or a 140 inches so physical rotor size is completely irrelevant in that respect, provided the caliper can handle the given size rotor. I never mentioned changing the size of the pads - only that the pads see more swept area on a larger rotor. It doesn't matter what size a given pad is - it will still sweep across more surface area at a faster speed on a larger rotor.

As for pad longevity, sintered ceramic seems to do the best for wear, but at the price if initial bite (they bite best after they heat up a bit) in my experience... and any type of organic and/or resin based ones tend to stop the best across all temp ranges but wear the fastest and have the worst wet performance It is true that different pad compositions have different wear and performance characteristics.
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I was bored and made a chart as to the difference in the swept area between a 6" and a 7" rotor, along with the
speed (in feet per minute) of the center of each at 300 RPM, or about 17MPH on a 19" tire. "Relative physics" will dictate how the end result of increased leverage against increased surface area scrubbed by the pads will affect pad life - the "relative" part being if that particular pads braking material can take advantage of the increased leverage and accept being worked at higher speeds and longer distances, and do so at the same wear rate.

This is turning into typing practice and we probably won't agree on the outcome.
Rotor size is only 1 slice of the pad wear pie - others include pad composition, apply pressures, weight, speed,
riding habits, etc. also determine pad life. Given the Asian nature of the market you may buy 5 "direct fit" sets of
pads for the same calipers and get 5 different results.

Hope the O/P enjoys his toy.
 

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