Kawasaki prairie 650 4x4

Cnapier

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Ok tell me something guys, if your starter relay just clicks, then you put a new one on and the battery is good, is it my starter for sure? This 4wheeler has sat for 3 years though
 

Denny

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Check all cables and grounds for corrosion. Make sure the battery has been load tested at Autozone or Advance or someplace and it passes. Then I would consider replacing the starter after all that.
 

madprofessor

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Does the motor turn over manually? Besides the starter, that's also what would happen if the motor was seized up after sitting for 3 years. Or the reason it was sitting still in the first place.
 

Cnapier

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Does the motor turn over manually? Besides the starter, that's also what would happen if the motor was seized up after sitting for 3 years. Or the reason it was sitting still in the first place.
How do I do that to see? Lol I know it's probably a stupid question
 

madprofessor

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There are no stupid questions, just the occasional stupid answer, and I'm not excluded from that. Since you're asking about manual rotation of the engine I'll assume it has no kickstarter. Not familiar with any 650 that's a 4x4, but my last bike was a 650 single banger that was so dangerous to your fragile shinbones that Suzuki refused to build a kickstarter on them. No starter, no starting.
What kind of clutch does it have? If it's some form of centrifugal clutch there's no pushstarting it. If it's a straight up manual clutch like my bike you can get it rolling good in neutral, pull the clutch, kick it in gear while standing up, and pop the clutch at the same time as you plop your rear end down hard on it.
 

FlyFrog

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There are no stupid questions, just the occasional stupid answer, and I'm not excluded from that. Since you're asking about manual rotation of the engine I'll assume it has no kickstarter. Not familiar with any 650 that's a 4x4, but my last bike was a 650 single banger that was so dangerous to your fragile shinbones that Suzuki refused to build a kickstarter on them. No starter, no starting.
What kind of clutch does it have? If it's some form of centrifugal clutch there's no pushstarting it. If it's a straight up manual clutch like my bike you can get it rolling good in neutral, pull the clutch, kick it in gear while standing up, and pop the clutch at the same time as you plop your rear end down hard on it.
its a side by side not a bike
 

DukeKL

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Check all cables and grounds for corrosion. Make sure the battery has been load tested at Autozone or Advance or someplace and it passes. Then I would consider replacing the starter after all that.
My buddy recently acquired this Kawasaki Brute Force that was left out under the tree for about 2 years. The previous owner said it got a new battery prior to hitting a fence and sat it. We'll take a closer look at the wirings first after we finished installing the suspension and fuel wheels on the truck and clear the garage. Hope the battery would still pass the load test.
 

Denny

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Because if there is a problem internally in the battery it and it has a short from corrosion it could blow up. With a slow charge the chances of that happening are lower before you notice there is a problem.
 

madprofessor

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Historically through my own battery recharge experiences: First and foremost for my forgetful/ busy/numbskull self is having correct charger to suit the type, size, amperage of the battery (of course, duh!), but just as importantly a charger that shuts its own self down no matter what!
A quality charger that does that will usually have the automatic ability to charge properly, that is to say, trickle charge unless you select a rapid charge function. From the cheapest nicad (nickel/cadmium) batteries of the distant past to modern lithium/ions, an automatic trickle charger with auto shutoff will solve all your battery problems, including not shortening their life with rapid charges.
Note: As far as I know, whatever the battery type is, running a battery down completely can damage the life expectancy, if not ruin it.
 
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