Hows my Welds?

GreyW00lf

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Hello All, Just wanted to show you guys my welds so far as I am learning to weld, Any tips or trick you could give me would be welcome.

Welds.jpg
 

Dingocat

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I'm assuming this is gasless fluxcore.

We were always taught CLAMS
C - current - basically the amount of "heat" you're putting into the metal

L - length of arc - how far between the surface and your electrode/contact tip in mig

A - angle - wrong angle will result in defects like porocity, gasses trapped in the weld, and or a lack of penetration

M - manipulation - how you move the gun/electrode, cursive e's or a wave shape work good.

S - speed - slower welding will result in a wider/lower bead, vs faster gives you thin and ropey.

From the welds you showed I'd suggest slowing down some and focus on what you're doing with the gun. Try going in little loops/cursive e's. And slow down when you're doing it. You want to see a puddle of liquid metal form and move that puddle around.

Sorry if any of that doesnt make sense to you, but good luck and keep practising.
-Dingocat
 

Bansil

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Instead of loops which can put Flux into weld.

Let's say 1/8 thick steel, get it clean, good ground. Try pulling the weld, and going up and down while push/pull to maintain distance, of wire from part being welded

Example: right handed weld left to right, have torch tilted slightly to the right so you can see puddle, start arc in valley and then move up,down say 3/16 inch, maintain distance, you want to push into the v and back out to go up and down, watch weld puddle.
Hope that helps, also you want wire feed fast enough so it sounds like bacon frying
 

Bansil

Painter of gnomes....
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Instead of loops which can put Flux into weld.

Let's say 1/8 thick steel, get it clean, good ground. Try pulling the weld, and going up and down while push/pull to maintain distance, of wire from part being welded

Example: right handed weld left to right, have torch tilted slightly to the right so you can see puddle, start arc in valley and then move up,down say 3/16 inch, maintain distance, you want to push into the v and back out to go up and down, watch weld puddle.
Hope that helps, also you want wire feed fast enough so it sounds like bacon frying
Also be comfortable before starting arc, no wt on arms, you want to be able to cover weld area while not moving, that helps
 

OPmini

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Hello All, Just wanted to show you guys my welds so far as I am learning to weld, Any tips or trick you could give me would be welcome.

Good start, Just remember to slow down if you think you are going too slow that's probably how fast you should be going. If the welds still look bad try going even slower, and always remember nice "cursive e's" or loops. Took me about 4-6 hours with a flux core mig to learn welding, keep it up! :wai:
 

gegcorp2012

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Should sound like sizzling bacon when you are laying down the weld, If you can hear spitting and sputtering from the puddle theres a problem.... you may also notice the wire feed motor having ing a constant sound (good) or changing in pitch during the weld (bad). I had lots of wire feed issues with my welder due to a slipping feed roller. It is worth mentioning because equipment quality or issues can make welding easier or harder to do respectively.

I think #2 and #5 look best. Take #5 as a good example that shows the heat that went into the base metal during the weld. The heat pattern (blue discoloration) is pretty uniform like an oval around your weld. It should look like the heat is uniform from the start to the finish of the weld. That's good.

#2 is more continuous than #1 or #3, but be aware that the contour (slight gap) along the two pieces of tubing will require more heat (+amps, slower draw, more wire speed, and/or tip closer to puddle) than the pass on one of the flat surfaces because there is more metal thickness vertically along that seam AND there's the gap to fill. Good that you are trying different things.

Have you tested any of your welds by tearing the pieces apart? You can try bending/breaking your practice welds (pieces at 90 degrees or butt welds) or cut through them and see if you can tell how far the weld penetrated.
 
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