Gas vs GassLess welding

Lolo Pat

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Hi everyone,

I use 0.8mm flux core welding wire (here in Oz, sorry don't know equivalent size in Imperial). My sequence of welding a run is
a) use side cutters to get a clean tip on the gun
b) weld a bit and stop
c) clean what I have welded (using wire brush and file to remove slag)
d) goto step a) :(

people welding on YouTube using a gas shield (therefore solid core wire)
a) weld a bit and stop
b) goto step a) and NO need to cut the wire at the gun tip :sneaky:

This looks a much more enjoyable way to weld. Am I missing something in my technique OR the reality is using a gas shield is the way to go.

Cheers
 

Millwright

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Gas shield is preferable.
A wire wheel on a 4.5" grinder makes slag removal a breeze.
 

Lolo Pat

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I watched this guy demo a 'flux welding machine' (
) and he used the gas shroud on the gun. I took mine off. Any opinions on welding gasless with it on or off?

I also see people weld with the shroud resting on the job, I guess that's one way to keep the tip a constant distance from the puddle.
 

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itsid

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I have a similarly powered gasless to the one in the video above..
I only used it a couple of times really since I don't need to weld too often (the main reason a cheap welder was the way to go for me)
Anyways.. I usually have the shroud on unless I maneuvered myself into a corner where it's hard to see where the bead will end up (lacking the experience here) then removing it gives me a better view ...
I have the impression (and it cannot be anything but an impression really) that those fumes are less annyoing with the shroud on.
And since I am quite certain I'd loose it someday if I'll leave it off for too long...
it's on most of the time...

'sid
 

Millwright

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If you have the option of using gas on your machine, that's great to have!!!
Not sure if you know this or not......
If your machine is capable of using gas, it may be wired so that the gun is positive, and the ground clamp will be negative, as it should be for using gas.
Flux core wire (gassles) needs to be set up opposite.

If you have it wrong, It will work, but you will have an excessive amount of spatter and a less uniform looking weld.

The attached pic shows a machine wired for gas use. The wire from the negative terminal (RHS) is the ground clamp
 

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7thofa2nd

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I like the flux core for convenience, and because I only had a small tank that was costing me as much to have filled as a large one would cost. I have the most fun welding with my oxy-accetaline tanks using coat hangers or for brazing. HA!!!
 

Lolo Pat

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I have the impression (and it cannot be anything but an impression really) that those fumes are less annyoing with the shroud on.

I always setup a fan close to the job when I weld, to disperse the fumes. Annoyingly I have the cool air on my face when I weld 🤦‍♂️, ah well (fan blades are 18" (46cm) across 😬).
 

Bansil

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Wow, talk about a Lincoln knock off, guarantee they are both made in same factory 🏭 :ROFLMAO:


It should work great, Def. Keep black plastic looking cup on the Flux weld to protect tips, copper looking one will be for gas
 

madprofessor

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I've done plenty of stick welding way up in the air, sometimes swinging around on a beam or even the headache ball, where the wind's blowing your puddle around and your life may depend on getting a solid tack. That's not even gas shielded welding, just straight stick.
Trust me, you only want a fan in a shop acting as an exhaust, sucking on the air and blowing it directly out of the room. You can close the room up and open some kind of make-up air relief (door, window, etc.) where you're welding between the open relief and the exhaust to gently drift all your fumes safely away.
 

Lolo Pat

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Trust me, you only want a fan in a shop acting as an exhaust

I move me car out of the garage and weld in there. I got the garage roller door up and the back door open AND the fan running 😂, you may call me paranoid about the fumes (when I weld it smells like I'm on a tropical island 🤣🤣).... but I get ya point.
 

52Ford

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I watched this guy demo a 'flux welding machine' (
) and he used the gas shroud on the gun. I took mine off. Any opinions on welding gasless with it on or off?

I also see people weld with the shroud resting on the job, I guess that's one way to keep the tip a constant distance from the puddle.
I watched this guy demo a 'flux welding machine' (
) and he used the gas shroud on the gun. I took mine off. Any opinions on welding gasless with it on or off?

I also see people weld with the shroud resting on the job, I guess that's one way to keep the tip a constant distance from the puddle.
The nozzle on a MIG is there to direct the shielding gas. You can actually get flux core nozzles to replace a MIG nozzle. They're smaller in diameter at the end for better visibility. The nozzle is electrically insulated from the tip (even the metal ones - those use a ceramic insulator.) You can "walk the cup" as you weld to help get a nice even weld.

The downside to MIG, is that you need sheilding gas. If you're welding outside or there's a fan blowing on you, it can blow the shielding gas away. FCAW and SMAW don't have that issue.

Also, you can still run shielding gas with flux core wire. Look up "dual shield" welding.
 

52Ford

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Also - stop cutting your wire unless it's sticking out too far. You don't need the flux exposed or whatever. Frankly, I don't even keep cutting pliers/welpers on my bench. I have a piece of steel on the bench I arc off on if the wire is too far out.
 

Bansil

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Also - stop cutting your wire unless it's sticking out too far. You don't need the flux exposed or whatever. Frankly, I don't even keep cutting pliers/welpers on my bench. I have a piece of steel on the bench I arc off on if the wire is too far out.
:ROFLMAO: I have always just used the bolt/nut on ground clamp.....looks like Medusa...I just replace bolt when I need to service ground 😛
 

52Ford

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I've done that a couple times as a sorta idiot check when I'm stick welding far enough away from the machine I can't hear it. Sometimes its rust between the clamp and the work, a little paint, whatever. Usually I just forgot to cut the machine on. Been meaning to buy some new ground clamps. Looking at the solid bronze ones. Think Tweco makes em. Other thing that works good is welding a stud to a C clamp or some vise grips and using that as a ground clamp.
 
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