Frame design

Millwright

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I'm kinda going for a mini F1 vibe.
Any suggestions. Just at the mocking up stage.
Nothing locked in yet.
 

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madprofessor

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Did you radius the square tubing with a 3-roller curling press, or was it walked through a pipe bender? Or other? Nice job, especially on the very difficult job of getting 2 graduated-radius pieces to mirror each other.
 

Millwright

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Yes I built a 3 roller press a while ago. I use two 2 ton Jack's and a 1/2" ratchet to operate it.

Close enough to fool the eye, but not quite perfect.
 

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Millwright

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a little front end detail.
With no suspension, I hope the frame is flexible enough that all 4 wheels are always touching the ground. Steering might be ****ty if one front wheel is higher.
I went with 8° caster.
20210711_113413.jpg
 

Snaker

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That looks cool, crazy long in the photo's.
What is the general length?

And OSB floor? With welding and grinding? Your a braver man than me.
 

Millwright

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92" Over all length
72" wheel base

Lol. I Always keep an eye open for smolders.
I've worked maintenance in saw mills, running arc air knee deep in bark chips. It's surprising hard to get a flame established. But there is always that "perfect storm" of conditions to watch out for.
 

Millwright

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Seat support in place and front wheels attached.
Now for some steering, pedals, floor pan and front bumper and probably a few other things I can't think of right now. Then strip it down again and weld er up solid for paint.
 

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madprofessor

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So 7&2/3' x 6', not quite as long as it looks. So cool that you built the equipment needed to get a job done, a man after my own style.
Looks like the ratchet only turns the mid roller, do you have to do it a degree-at-a-time to get the tubes to walk through it? I can't even imagine what could be done to increase the traction.
Sawmills, huh? I used to take care of a big chiller for all the hydraulic fluid used at a Ga.-Pacific mill. They kept dropping trees on it from the conveyor belt running way up overhead on the way to debarking.
 

Millwright

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Width is 43" out to out.

It all gets smaller when I put my heavy *** in it!
 

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Millwright

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So 7&2/3' x 6', not quite as long as it looks. So cool that you built the equipment needed to get a job done, a man after my own style.
Looks like the ratchet only turns the mid roller, do you have to do it a degree-at-a-time to get the tubes to walk through it? I can't even imagine what could be done to increase the traction.
Sawmills, huh? I used to take care of a big chiller for all the hydraulic fluid used at a Ga.-Pacific mill. They kept dropping trees on it from the conveyor belt running way up overhead on the way to debarking.
Ya MadPro, you are spot on about the roller. It is hard to get traction. Baby steps for sure. On the positive side, it's hard to overshoot your radius.
You've had some good work experience over the years?
 

madprofessor

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Roger that on the work experience. Retired as an unlimited class HVACR technician at the top of my field. That means I had to be as good at a half dozen trades as people who did only that trade for a living. Worked on hospitals and operating theatres air conditioning, modified -125 F. below zero cascade system test chambers for fighter jet and submarine batteries, changed out RTU's on shopping malls w/90-ton 190' crane, ran some cranes, replaced compressors on port cranes 110' in the air, -20 F. below zero freezers they back boxcars into for unloading and stacking, oven they back flatbed cars into to bake giant motor armatures, installed full building EMS controls, worked on cargo ships, nuclear submarine tender ships, tugboats, houseboats, etc., you know, boring stuff.
 

Millwright

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So I picked up my aluminum for the floor pan. Putting that in place and also welding up the frame. Waiting on some steering components.
It's getting tiresome putting on all the components and stripping them off again.
I need to reinstall the engine and drive train components to set up brakes and throttle. Strip it down again for paint!
 

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madprofessor

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Is that checker plate your new floorpan? Hard work, many many screws to prevent rattle, since you can't weld aluminum sheeting to steel tubes.
You could apply 1" wide self-adhering foam tape (2" wide Virginia K501 has been my dear friend for decades) to the tubes, use half as many screws, no rattle.
 

Millwright

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Thanks MadPro, will keep that in mind.
Pan is only 30" long, has two bends in it, and only attaches at each end. I will put some foam gasket tape at the bolt locations, but I don't think it will be too bad.
I originally only wanted "heal rests" at the pedals and go without a pan. But that's probably a little too dangerous if your foot slipped onto the pavement at speed. Not to mention crap flying up at you lol.
.063" aluminum, I doubt I added a pound to the weight.
 

madprofessor

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Okay, I looked. Welding alum./SS with TIG or anything else is considered pointless, no strength. There is one product I saw video on from Muggyweld.com, called Super Alloy 1 for soldering dissimilar metals. Uses low 350 degree heat, so a common propane torch can do it. Left an attractive finished joint, and for a floorpan with little safety to be concerned about over weakness it looked feasible.
 
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