Electric tool question

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Panhead5496

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So I see on YouTube videos guys using battery powered tools for just about everything, from taking off lug nuts to using it for small lock nuts to attaching a wire brush to scuff stuff and whatever else they find a need for.

What are they using? A drill with special attachments? I can't seem to find what is able to be used with hex bolts and then be changed to use as a drill and used to put on lug nuts (assuming the ft-lb is adjustable for that?)

Can anyone point me in the correct direction? I'm used to just using "regular" tools but it would be nice to have an electric powered something that does all that...if it even exists??

Thanks for the suggestions guys. And don't roast me if this is a dumb question LOL, I've never really used the "fancy" electric stuff.
 

anickode

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Cordless impact driver with a socket adapter for little stuff

Cordless impact wrench for big stuff.

A drill is not the tool you want for that, unless you like destroying drills and/or breaking appendages.

Honestly, an impact wrench/driver ain't exactly ideal either.

Ugga-duggas are not an accurate measurement of torque.
 

Branderino

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Impact tools are fine you just have to be careful not to over or under torque things because it’s hard to tell how hard you got it. But you can use a wrench or even a torque wrench afterwards if you want to make sure you have it tight enough. But in my opinion once you are familiar with your gun it’s pressy easy to get pretty close torque based on the number of impacts it makes.
 

Whitetrashrocker

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Batteries have been getting better but I find most cordless stuff is best for hanging pictures.
Every time I need to use it the Batts are dead and I don't want to wait for them to charge.
I like the torque of a big electric hammer drill or the disc grinder.
For the most part I use pneumatic in the shop.

But I do envy the tools in the videos you speak of. Looks small and handy. But how many edits in that vid are also a battery change.
 

Kartorbust

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A lit of mechanics are ditching air tools in favor for battery impacts. Some still have an air impact gun with torque sticks to run lug nuts or lug studs down. But either way they finish up with a torque wrench.

Milwaukee is the cheapest 1/2" impact used there currently with Snap-On being the most expensive. One thing to note is, if you do use a 1/2" battery impact, do not use torque sticks on them. It can end up doing damage to the impact itself (not sure what kind as they didn't explain it very well).

I have a Porter Cable one on my list of tools to buy. Been using a 20v DeWalt 1/4" impact driver for 5 years to pull bolts, nuts off vehicles and it's been great. Though mine is brushed as Fleet Farm was out of stock on the brushless model. Should replace my old Lithium batteries soon though. Anyway mine is supposedly rated at 1400in/lbs of torque which is roughly 116.5ft/lbs.

---------- Post added at 09:46 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:41 AM ----------

Batteries have been getting better but I find most cordless stuff is best for hanging pictures.
Every time I need to use it the Batts are dead and I don't want to wait for them to charge.
I like the torque of a big electric hammer drill or the disc grinder.
For the most part I use pneumatic in the shop.

But I do envy the tools in the videos you speak of. Looks small and handy. But how many edits in that vid are also a battery change.
You'll be surprised on how long new batteries will last. I run 1.5 ah batteries for my driver impact and I get a good 8+ hours of run time from both batteries. If you go with the largest ah battery, you can get quite a few hours in before needing a recharge. But that's what you get when you buy lithium batteries vs ni-cad or ni-mh.

They are well worth the investment as long as you plan to use them on a daily basis, otherwise they end up being wasted space in a tool box or shelf.
 

anickode

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Batteries have been getting better but I find most cordless stuff is best for hanging pictures.
Every time I need to use it the Batts are dead and I don't want to wait for them to charge.
I like the torque of a big electric hammer drill or the disc grinder.
For the most part I use pneumatic in the shop.

But I do envy the tools in the videos you speak of. Looks small and handy. But how many edits in that vid are also a battery change.

I use mostly Milwaukee M18 cordless tools. You can get batteries up to 12ah and they're completely interchangeable. My cordless M18 Magnum (About 5yo, pre-FUEL) hand drill will run a 3" hole saw through 3/8" steel plate with ease. If you can hang on to it, that is. If not, it will happily break your wrist. No shortage of torque there.

The trick is to pick a brand (preferrably a good one) and stick with it so you have multiple batteries and chargers all ready to go. Don't buy a ryobi drill, a DeWalt rattle gun,
A Ridgid reciprocating saw, etc. Get em all the same.

Lithium batteries and chargers won't overcharge if you just leave it on there till you need it, and they aren't damaged by partial charge/discharge cycles either. So just keep your Batts on the charger and you never have to worry about it.
 

itsid

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I have a vintage makita cordless.. (vintage might be a stretch alright..)
anyways no LiPo good ol NiCd 1.2Ah (and it's only 12V or such)
and it drilled amazingly large holes in everything I threw it at.
It fastened about every nut I asked it to and I cannot complain about battery life either..

Yes by now the brushes worn out (and it lost a severe amount of power) and the battery is nearly dead too (NiCD do not age well ;))

But power has NOTHING to do with battery chemicals
A 1.2Ah NiCD is about as long lasting as a 1.2AH LiPo just heavier
it might not live as long (fewer recharge cycles usually)
but it's just juice either way..
(yes LiPos bounce back quicker, can deliver higher peak amps etc but it's not the magic spell people read in the ads about)

It's the motor and controller that make all the difference.
(well good internal gears help as well... battery not so much)

I'd say take a look at AvE's tool reviews from back in the days..
He ripped several cordless' in half and taped them shut again.
And quite a few packed a serious punch!

Anyways, how long a battery lasts is up to the task at hand..
just like with everything
if you ask for a LOT of power (say drilling a 1/"" hole in 5/8" stainless)
an Amphour can be depleted within minutes.
If you just tighten bolts it'll last a day ;)
Pedal to the metal a gallon of fuel is gone in seconds
if you cruise down the avenue it'll last a good while, not?

'sid
 

Kaptain Krunch

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I have an 18v lithium makita 1/4" impact driver...and i use that sucker for EVERYTHING. I run my own business (small engine repair), I rarely touch a ratchet on disassembly. The batteries charge in 20 mins, when one dies the next is ready and its almost impossible to kill one in 20 minutes. It has plenty of power (1400 Inch/lbs IIRC), will remove small car lug nuts with a full charge. I also use it for carpentry quite often, driving screws.

Side note, i bought the makita set to replace my 20v dewalt, and much prefer the makita. Its slightly more compact, quicker charge, brushes are easier to replace, and the LED light is brighter.
 

Kartorbust

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I got my 1/2 20v Porter Cable impact a couple weeks ago and it buzzes lug nuts off cars and trucks without much issue. You do not need to spend much on a quality power tool for a job. I havent tried the Harbor Freight electric impact, but it cannot be that terrible. Word of advice, do not use torque limiting sticks with electric impacts, as those can mess with the hammer or motor.
 
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