Go Back   DIY Go Kart Forum > Building Plans And Advice > All Other Parts

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-07-2019, 12:54 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default Composite drive wheels

I have been looking for some narrow(er) "keyed" (6") "drive" rims (~3" wide)
...but, most of the (6") rims that I've found are (~5") wide (~$19.00 ea.)
https://www.bmikarts.com/6-x-4-12-St...re_p_5402.html

Then, I was thinkin'
...maybe I can just add hubs to those composite rims from Surplus Center (~$7.00 ea.)
...would even be lower cost & lighter weight
https://www.surpluscenter.com/Wheels...y-1-116259.axd


Lookin' into it a bit, the "hub hole" of these composite rims is (~1 5/8")
…& a hub for a 1" axle is to big (~1 3/4" OD)
…but, the hub for a 3/4" axle seems like it will work (~1 1/2")

* Just happen to have a differential with 3/4" axle shafts

So, I rounded up some 3/4" hubs (from a Craftsman riding lawn mower)
…& then, cut 'em out of the (way too huge) rims

Now, we gotta get 'em installed into the composite rims

I'm gettin' 'em ground down to the hubs (removing the excess material)

Questions:
1.) Would an epoxy work to bond these hubs into these rims?
…if so, recommendations on types or kinds of epoxy

2.) Should the hubs be "shiny" clean metal or painted?

3.) How long do ya think they will last?

Thanks, fellas
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_9819.jpg   SAM_9821.jpg  

SAM_9822.jpg   SAM_1224.jpg  

SAM_1226.jpg   SAM_1227.jpg  

SAM_1228.jpg  
__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-09-2019, 07:53 AM
Texan's Avatar
Texan Texan is offline
Senor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Deep In The Heart of Texas
Posts: 427
Thanks: 168
Thanked 215 Times in 167 Posts
Default

Looks iffy, but you are a pretty crafty guy. We use a few epoxies at my job, and we try to get the surfaces as clean as possible for the best adhesion.
__________________
Whatcha says no good.?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Texan For This Useful Post:
Functional Artist (10-10-2019)
  #3  
Old 10-09-2019, 08:23 AM
anickode's Avatar
anickode anickode is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: S.E. Michigan
Posts: 1,796
Thanks: 59
Thanked 800 Times in 555 Posts
Default

It really depends on what type of plastic the wheels are made of. Polyethylene products for example, are basically unglueable.

I'd bet they're probably a Nylon or PAG (glass fiber reinforced nylon). An epoxy made for plastics should work. I wouldn't rely solely on the bond strength to transmit torque however. I would go inside the bore with a saw blade and make a series of shallow radial cuts (like splines) to allow a mechanical interface between the epoxy and wheel. Do the same on the outside of the hub sleeve, either cutting into it with a grinder, or by adding some beads of weld along the length of it.

That's your best bet, IMO. Only thing better I could think of would be to machine some thicker hub sleeves, cut shallow splines into the outside of it, heat it up, and press it straight into the bore of the wheel, melting the plastic and fusing them together. But that is a lot more complicated, and would probably cost more than sourcing the proper wheels in the first place.
__________________
"Well that would be a bomb."
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to anickode For This Useful Post:
Functional Artist (10-10-2019)
  #4  
Old 10-11-2019, 11:00 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default exothermic reaction

Been doin' some grindin' & shapin"
…& a little research

"Epoxy glue is a synthetic mixture of a resin or epoxy polymer and a hardener used to attach or join a variety of the same or different surfaces together with a strong, durable and resilient thermosetting bond that can withstand extreme stress and environmental conditions"

"Epoxies are created by polymerizing a mixture of two starting compounds, the resin and the hardener. When resin is mixed with a specified catalyst, curing is initiated. Curing is the process by which molecular chains react at chemically active sites, resulting in an exothermic reaction."

Think Ima gonna try some of this stuff

JB Weld Clear Weld

•ClearWeld is a quick setting, multipurpose two part epoxy that provides a strong and lasting bond on most surfaces including tile, most plastics, ceramic, glass, wood and metal
•ClearWeld is designed to cure with a clear, transparent bond when used at thicknesses of less than 15 mil
•ClearWeld has a 1:1 mixing ratio, sets in 5 minutes and cures in 1 hour
•With a tensile strength of 4400 PSI, ClearWeld sets to a hard, permanent bond
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1241.jpg   SAM_1243.jpg  

SAM_1246.jpg   SAM_1247.jpg  

SAM_1250.jpg   SAM_1276.jpg  

SAM_1277.jpg  
__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-12-2019, 08:00 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Directions say:

1.) prep by roughening both surfaces (#40 sand paper)
2.) clean 'em with degreaser (alcohol)
3.) thoroughly mix equal amounts of epoxy (A) & (B)
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1278.jpg   SAM_1261.jpg  

SAM_1262.jpg   SAM_1264.jpg  

SAM_1265.jpg   SAM_1267.jpg  

SAM_1268.jpg   SAM_1269.jpg  

SAM_1270.jpg   SAM_1271.jpg  

__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-12-2019, 09:14 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Before, I mixed the epoxy, I drilled a 3/4" hole (@ 90*) in a piece of plywood
…& then, inserted a piece of 3/4" axle shaft
(to use as a centering/squaring/mounting/gluing/epoxying stand)

After, mixing the epoxy, I slathered a heavy layer of it onto the outside of the metal hub & then, slide it into the 3/4" shaft
…then, carefully set the composite rim down onto/over the hub
…then, drizzled some of the remaining epoxy down into the gap (~1/16") between the hub & rim
…& then, weighted the rim down to keep 'er from moving while the epoxy cured
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1257.jpg   SAM_1258.jpg  

SAM_1260.jpg   SAM_1266.jpg  

SAM_1272.jpg   SAM_1273.jpg  

SAM_1274.jpg   SAM_1280.jpg  

SAM_1288.jpg   SAM_1289.jpg  

__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Functional Artist For This Useful Post:
ezcome-ezgo (10-14-2019)
  #7  
Old 10-14-2019, 07:06 AM
ezcome-ezgo's Avatar
ezcome-ezgo ezcome-ezgo is offline
G'me sumthin to write on
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,015
Thanks: 2,481
Thanked 1,006 Times in 807 Posts
Default

The outcome of this must be posted here. The world is waiting...
__________________
My name is Sylvester McMonkey McBean. I will make a decontamination.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-14-2019, 10:32 AM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Well, that's the first one
…& it seems like a pretty solid bond to me

On the second one, Ima gonna add try-n-add some "splines" to the hub & rim
...like "anickode" suggested

I just wanted to see how the first one, would turn out...first
__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-20-2019, 11:34 AM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default Spacer Ring

The original plan was to make & use a "temporary spacer ring"
...as a "removable" centering/alignment spacer, between the hub & rim

I put it on the bottom side
…& left it protruding out ~1/8"

The plan was to only apply the epoxy to the top side
…& let it "set" (~5min.)

Then, flip the rim over
...remove the "spacer ring"
…& then, drizzle in some of the epoxy, to bond the other side.

Here's what actually happened

1.) the epoxy "drained" all of the way down/thru the rim
…& "glued" the now-permanent "spacer ring" in place

2.) also, when I flipped the rim over to drizzle some more of the epoxy into the other side
...the rest of the epoxy had already "set up" in the pan

Well, it didn't go "according to plan"
...but, it got the job done
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1282.jpg   SAM_1283.jpg  

SAM_1286.jpg  
__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-20-2019, 10:47 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Been cuttin' some splines
...inner & outies

Made a new centering spacer
...this one will be permanent too

Then, masked/covered the rim to protect it from any "excess/mess"
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1408.jpg   SAM_1409.jpg  

SAM_1410.jpg   SAM_1412.jpg  

SAM_1413.jpg   SAM_1422.jpg  

SAM_1423.jpg   SAM_1419.jpg  

SAM_1420.jpg   SAM_1428.jpg  

__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Functional Artist For This Useful Post:
ezcome-ezgo (10-21-2019)
  #11  
Old 10-23-2019, 12:39 PM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Sorry for the delay, I had to get some more epoxy

This centering spacer is made of a bit thicker material
…so, it fit's over both the hub & inside of the rim, pretty tightly

After givin' everything a good cleanin'/de-greasin', I applied some epoxy onto the hub
…slid the centering ring on
…then, slathered a thick layer over the whole thing
…& finally, slid it into the rim

It took a bit of effort to slide 'er in
...but, she fit's nice-n-snug
…& is very well centered

Had to align the hub, within the rim, so that ~3/8" was stickin' out on each side (just like the other rim)
...then, drizzled some of the epoxy into the "gap" & around the hub, on both sides

*While the epoxy was still "runny", I also "sealed up" the back side of the first rim by drizzling some of the remaining epoxy around it

Boom! (2) composite drive wheels
Attached Thumbnails
SAM_1432.jpg   SAM_1433.jpg  

SAM_1431.jpg   SAM_1436.jpg  

SAM_1437.jpg   SAM_1439.jpg  

SAM_1440.jpg   SAM_1443.jpg  

SAM_1444.jpg   SAM_1445.jpg  

__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-23-2019, 08:44 PM
Dingocat's Avatar
Dingocat Dingocat is offline
Broke
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Cleveland Ohio
Posts: 401
Thanks: 33
Thanked 82 Times in 67 Posts
Default

Now the test: do they hold up? or if one fails which is it
__________________
Current Manco hoarder
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-24-2019, 07:34 AM
ezcome-ezgo's Avatar
ezcome-ezgo ezcome-ezgo is offline
G'me sumthin to write on
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 3,015
Thanks: 2,481
Thanked 1,006 Times in 807 Posts
Default

I'll bet you a haircut one of them will fail.
__________________
My name is Sylvester McMonkey McBean. I will make a decontamination.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-24-2019, 09:12 AM
Functional Artist's Avatar
Functional Artist Functional Artist is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 1,997
Thanks: 767
Thanked 753 Times in 598 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ezcome-ezgo View Post
I'll bet you a haircut one of them will fail.
Oh, ye of little faith

It's just an experiment to see
A.) if I could do it
B.) & if so, how long they would last
C.) data: if/when one of them fail (or both) I/we'll know, for sure "what, where, when, why & how"

* These rims are actually made/sold for/as wheelbarrow wheels
...but, low cost/light weight ...hmmm
…& I'm always re-purposing stuff


I have tested these rims on, the front of, the Torsk kart, Damien & also, the Atom kart
...with NO ISSUES what so ever (just installed "proper" bearings)


My initial concerned was, if they could handle all of the dynamic loading that can be applied by the front of a kart
...but, they seem to handle it pretty well (so far anyways)


So, now we are gonna find out if/how well they hold up to the dynamic loading applied by the rear of a kart
...plus, we'll "throw in" the torque applied by an electric motor too

* Stay tuned, there's more to come
__________________
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:01 AM.