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Old 09-12-2019, 03:37 PM
madprofessor madprofessor is offline
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Default To #35 or knot w/excessive horsepower.

To win with #35 chain, or knot it up, when you've got 12+ hp......
My experience says #35 won't make it. As soon as I applied all that horsepower through a CVT (torque converter) to an almost new #35 chain that was well proven to run nice on a 12/60 tooth setup w/spring tensioner without stretching, it stretched the chain out enough to jump off, then jump off again, then snap it outright. All real quickly.
Note that a CVT has a 3-to-1 ratio (times 12+ hp.) at a dead startup, but torque is torque, the chain gets hauled on either way.
Currently choosing a new #41 setup, which is much beefier and increases the link length from 3/8" to 1/2". (The first digit in the 2-digit chain is how many 1/8" there are center-to-center between each pin on the links.)
Since my #35 setup includes a combo 60-tooth rear sprocket/machined 4.5" ID internal drum brake hub, I'll need to find a 4.5" ID hub with a universal flange that will bolt up to my 6" Asuza wheel. Then I'll need a #41 ring sprocket to bolt up to the flange, a #41 drive sprocket with 3/4" bore, and a box of #41 chain with a few master links. Probably $100 all in, maybe shipping too.
Point is: It's already been proven once that the #35 can't hold that much power, and with 3 spare master links I could keep trying it. But why? Better to just go ahead and admit I underestimated the power, and just let the machine sit until a #41 setup comes in.
No, there's spare master links I'll never need again, about 6' more new chain in the box I'll never need again, and if I strip all the teeth off the current sprockets, so what? There'll be all new sprockets and chain coming in. Yee haa! Where'd I put my chain breaker?

Last edited by madprofessor; 09-12-2019 at 09:27 PM. Reason: Set some paragraph breaks.
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:53 PM
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Hellion Hellion is offline
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Too long, I didn't read.

Try some page breaks or spaces.
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Old 09-12-2019, 08:36 PM
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High quality #35 chain will handle 20+ HP in racing high RPM applications.

With or without a TC.

Check out ARC for a high quality chain tool. IMHO mastet links kind of suck at higher HP applications. With a good chain tool you don't need to mess with them.
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Old 09-12-2019, 09:28 PM
madprofessor madprofessor is offline
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Thanks Randy, that's encouraging. The chain BREAKER I have is actually a good one, I was just kidding, know exactly where everything is in the "Holy Garage".
Wasn't aware of any hand tools that REPLACE a master link. Does that mean it presses in a couple of pins where a master link would ordinarily be used? Don't even know what a IMHO master link is, or what kind I've got.
Am aware that a bad application can drag the clip of one off the pins, hence turning it the right way. None at all? Like the sound of that.
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:51 PM
Randy H Randy H is offline
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Here's a video by Jody Powell from ARC Racing. About 6 minutes in he demonstrates pushing the pins in.

"Easy peasy, lemon squeasy."

IMHO=In my humble opinion.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:17 PM
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I would also still stick with the #35. Just get a real good quality racing chain. It will probably be cheaper than changing over to #41
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Old 09-13-2019, 12:35 AM
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#41 isn’t really any stronger than #35.
It actually has a lower tensile strength than #35.
If you want stronger chain, go with #40 or #420.

If it’s the standard 30 series TC, the jackshaft is 5/8” NOT 3/4”.
So you’d need a 5/8” bore sprocket, not 3/4”.
I believe you can find 30 series driven units with 3/4” bore, but I don’t think they are very common.
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Old 09-13-2019, 10:01 AM
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Default Good info.....

Thanks for all the good input. I am going to go back to some video on chain sizing to get more info on the diffs of #40,41, 420, and thanks for the vid link to ARC. Was planning to pull my drive sprocket to verify that bore, had been seeing the 10-tooth spare on my bench, thought I was seeing 3/4", but have slowly lost my spatial sight over time. Used to could eyeball down to an RCH. BTW, AMA & WME it's clear that I'm just too old to keep up with modern speed speak, IMHO. (By The Way, At My Age & With My Experience......)
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Old 09-18-2019, 11:12 AM
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Appreciate the guidance on different chains. Got some real facts from distributors, now know that #41 is out of the question, narrower than #40 or #420. They say the heaviest-duty is a #420, and I'm inclined to make that switch even if it's overkill. Saw the ARC chain tool, must have it, putting the pins back in instead of a 3-piece master link looks oh so much more trustworthy.
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